How to frame black and white prints

how to frame black and white prints

Black and White Framed Art

Jul 11,  · But with black and white photos we’re dealing with tones and shades instead. If you have an image with white bleeding to the edge, a white mat with a black core will create a nice, almost pencil like border. Same applies with using a photo with black edges and a black mat, a white core will create a fine white border. Black and white art is classic, timeless, and beautiful. Many artists have found ways to produce framed black and white masterpieces that have no chance of ever going out of style. When a work is done in black and white it allows the art lover to focus on the details rather than being lost in the colors/5(K).

More Decor Ideas. Toggle navigation. Sign In. Black and White Photography. View All Small Medium Large. View All Square Wide Tall. Product Types. Black Framed Art. Sort By:. Customize Add To Cart. Framed Black and White Photos. Framed black and white photo art images are a great artistic addition to any room that needs more spirit, and the FramedArt. Some of the most famous black and white framed art photos of all time include Lunchtime Atop a Skyscraper and Flag Raising on Iwo Jima.

These images what is oven temp 325 f in c historic moments in the past. Photography, regardless of its style, is an essential aspect of modern art and society, as it catches a moment of intense emotion or a specific event, preserved for a long time.

A framed black and white photographic print is an excellent choice, whether your home decor is traditional or contemporary in nature. Sign Up for Exclusive Offers:. Email address is invalid. Please enter a valid email address and click the submit button. Plus get exclusive members only sales, new product info and more!

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Black and White Prints

A framed black and white photographic print is an excellent choice, whether your home decor is traditional or contemporary in nature. If you love classic photography, choosing a B&W photo will add unique beauty and energy to any room/5(K).

In many ways they can have more impact in a room than a coloured photograph, and consisting of tones instead of colours means they fit with most decors.

Black and white photos make fabulous wall art, so you want to make sure to do them justice with the right frame. A mat, matboard or sometimes called a mount, is a flat paper based material with a window cut out, that sits within the frame but on top of the photo. It serves to add an extra visual appeal as well as separating the print from the glass. Most commonly a mat will be white when used for a black and white print.

Black mats are also used. Is one better than the other? Not really, it does just come down to personal taste.

White or black mats, or any colour in fact, will have a different effect on how it presents the image. White can be more open while black tends to close it in. The colour of the matting will also highlight or subdue certain tones and contrast in the print. With coloured images the general rule is to match a dominant colour in the photo to draw the eye to the image rather than the frame. If the image has a focal point, the mat can match the background colours instead, this way the eye is drawn to the focal point.

If you have an image with white bleeding to the edge, a white mat with a black core will create a nice, almost pencil like border.

Same applies with using a photo with black edges and a black mat, a white core will create a fine white border. But remember to take the wall colour and decor into consideration. Another consideration is the style of photograph. Is it portraiture, landscape, fine art or abstract? You want to compliment the theme or mood of the subject matter.

One of them even lets you choose the wall colour. One, because the mat will be the largest and most dominant area and needs to work with the image, and secondly it will be harder to find a complimentary mat colour to match if the frame and image are already working well together. The only time you may need to give it some thought is if the print has a sepia or other toning or coloured accent.

With black and white prints the frame colour is more important to match the wall and existing decor than what sits within it.

So how do you match them together? The frame will need to be a stronger or darker colour than the mat. But I have seen a white frame used on a white wall to create the effect of the picture floating. Sepia and selenium is a reddish-brown tone that gives that oldy worldy look to an image. In darkroom days of old these are actually two different processes. With the sepia look you won't go wrong with a white mat and black frame combination. If you need a white frame, a white mat will work and so will black, especially on a dark wall.

A solid navy blue and forest green frame may you surprise you, as these colours offset the reddish-brown. Sometimes a black and white print will have a slight tone to add effect. And now with digital processing they can also be split toned. Like with sepia, the same white and black combinations are a safe and good looking choice.

But if you feel a creative urge coming on, get on that colour wheel! Been to IKEA? You know the ones, the black and white shot of London with a red bus or telephone box. A monochrome New York City street with a yellow cab. These are the more universally available accented prints, but some photographers do them well. Using coloured frames, even of the same or complementary colour will distract the eye from the accent in the image. The coloured accent is the focal point, not the frame.

The blue accent in this photo ties in with the wall colour, and the white frame suits the image as well as matching the wall and mantle. There are many different styles of photography within the black and white genre as well as variety of frames. There are definitely styles of frame that will suit a photograph, but what about colour? You can undoubtedly take this into consideration.

Again it comes back to matching the decor, but a certain colour can reflect the mood of a black and white image. If you have a monochrome landscape of a forest for instance, using a green or brown frame can suggest colours of the scene whilst still matching the other decor elements. You can apply this to other subjects like seascapes, food photography, wildlife, whatever the content of the image.

What colours are suitable for various frame styles? An old sepia photo can look good in a brown or wood rustic frame over a modern silver aluminium frame. Some fine art photographs can look amazing in an industrial or grungy type frame of any colour.

Being able to preview your choices means you can explore other colour ideas before committing to hanging the photo on the wall. Please feel free to leave a comment and share your black and white photo framing adventures. Can You Frame Metal Prints? Can You Frame a Canvas Print? What is a Mounted Print? How to Prevent Photographs From Fading. Recent Posts See All.

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