What os the zika virus

what os the zika virus

Zika virus structure revealed

Zika virus is similar to dengue fever, yellow fever and West Nile virus. Carried by infected Aedes aegypti mosquitos, Zika is largely transmitted through bites, but can also occur through intrauterine infection. If a woman is bitten by an infected mosquito and becomes infected, Zika . Information on Zika virus. Provided by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Zika is spread mostly by the bite of an infected Aedes species mosquito. The best way to prevent Zika is to protect yourself from mosquito bites.

The most common symptoms of Zika are fever, rash, headache, joint pain, red eyes, and muscle pain. Zika is spread mostly by the bite of an infected mosquito. Prevent Zika by avoiding mosquito bites.

Up-to-date guidance, resources, and training for providers evaluating and caring for patients with Zika. Learn the top 5 things you need to know aika Zika. Zika and dengue testing guidelines updated November In andno local mosquito-borne Zika virus how to get free unlimited vpn has been reported in the continental United States.

If you are traveling outside of the continental United States, see Zika Travel Information to learn about your destination. Prevent mosquito bites when traveling:. Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options Skip directly to Vkrus link.

Zika Virus. Section Navigation. Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Syndicate. Minus Related Pages. Mosquitoes and Hurricanes. Men and Zika. Pregnant women. Areas with Risk of Zika. About Zika. Zika in the US. For Healthcare Providers. Mosquito Control. Information for Specific Groups. What's your Wat IQ? Is Resources. Communication Resources. Prevent mosquito bites when traveling: Use Environmental Protection Agency EPA -registered insect repellent to protect yourself and your family from mosquito bites.

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Q: What is Zika?

Zika is spread mostly by the bite of an infected Aedes species mosquito (Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus). These mosquitoes bite during the day and night. Zika can be passed from a pregnant woman to her fetus. Infection during pregnancy can cause certain birth defects. Zika virus was discovered in Uganda in It’s a type of virus called a flavivirus. Other flaviviruses include dengue, yellow fever, and West Nile viruses. Like its relatives, Zika virus is mainly transmitted to humans through the bite of infected Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. The Zika virus is a positive sense, single-stranded RNA arbovirus in the Flaviviridae family, genus Flavivirus. This virus was initially isolated in Africa and is transmitted to nonhuman primates and humans by mosquitoes. Initial reports describe sporadic mild viral infection with fever, arthralgia, myalgia and conjunctivitis in Africa and likedatingen.com by:

A: Zika virus disease is caused by the Zika virus, which is spread to people primarily through the bite of an infected mosquito Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus. The illness is usually mild with symptoms lasting up to a week, and many people do not have symptoms or will have only mild symptoms. However, Zika virus infection during pregnancy can cause a serious birth defect called microcephaly and other severe brain defects.

A: Zika is spread to people primarily through the bite of an infected Aedes species mosquito Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus. A pregnant woman can pass Zika to her fetus during pregnancy or around the time of birth. Also, a person with Zika can pass it to his or her sex partners. We encourage people who have traveled to or live in places with risk of Zika to protect themselves by preventing mosquito bites and sexual transmission of Zika.

A: Many people infected with Zika will have no symptoms or mild symptoms that last several days to a week. However, Zika infection during pregnancy can cause a serious birth defect called microcephaly and other severe fetal brain defects. Current research suggests that Guillain-Barre syndrome GBS , an uncommon sickness of the nervous system, is strongly associated with Zika; however, only a small proportion of people with recent Zika virus infection get GBS.

There is no evidence that past Zika infection poses an increased risk of birth defects in future pregnancies. Before traveling to other areas with current or past spread of Zika as indicated by purple areas on Zika map , pregnant women should discuss their travel plans with a doctor. Travelers who go to places with outbreaks or past or current spread as indicated by red or purple areas on Zika map can be infected with Zika. Zika infection during pregnancy can cause microcephaly and other severe brain defects.

A: Yes. Travelers who go to places with Zika outbreaks as indicated by red areas on Zika map or with current or past spread of Zika as indicated by purple areas on Zika map might be at risk of infection with Zika. Pregnant women and couples trying to become pregnant within 3 months of travel should work with their healthcare providers to carefully consider the risks and possible consequences of travel.

Zika travel notices are posted when there is an outbreak. Because Zika can cause microcephaly and other severe birth defects, pregnant women should NOT travel to any area with a Zika outbreak as indicated by red areas on Zika map. Women trying to get pregnant should talk to their healthcare providers to carefully consider the risks and possible consequences of Zika infection before traveling to areas reporting current or past spread of Zika as indicated by purple areas on Zika map , but no current outbreak.

Those traveling to areas with Zika outbreaks or with current or past spread of Zika should take steps during and after they travel to prevent mosquito bites and sexual transmission of Zika. A: The best way to prevent Zika is to protect yourself and your family from mosquito bites:. Zika can be spread by a person infected with Zika to his or her sex partners.

Condoms can reduce the chance of getting Zika from sex. Condoms include male and female condoms. To be effective, condoms should be used from start to finish, every time during vaginal, anal, and oral sex and the sharing of sex toys. Not having sex eliminates the risk of getting Zika from sex. Pregnant couples with a partner who traveled to or lives in an area with risk of Zika should use condoms every time they have sex or not have sex during the pregnancy.

A: The most common symptoms of Zika virus disease are fever, rash, headache, joint pain, red eyes, and muscle pain. A: To diagnose Zika, your doctor will ask you about recent travel and symptoms you may have, and collect blood or urine to test for Zika or similar viruses. A: Zika virus testing is performed at CDC and some state and territorial health departments.

See your doctor if you have Zika symptoms and have recently been in an area with risk of Zika. Your doctor may order tests to look for Zika or similar viruses like dengue and chikungunya. Pregnant women should see a doctor if they have any Zika symptoms during their trip or after traveling. All pregnant women can protect themselves by avoiding travel to an area with risk of Zika, preventing mosquito bites , and following recommended precautions against getting Zika through sex. A: Currently, there is no evidence that a woman who has recovered from Zika virus infection the virus has cleared her body will have Zika-related pregnancy complications in the future.

Based on information about similar infections, once a person has been infected with Zika virus and has cleared the virus from his or her body, he or she is likely to be protected from future Zika infections.

A: Men who have traveled to areas with risk of Zika should wait at least 3 months after travel or 3 months after symptoms started if they get sick before trying to conceive with their partner. Women should wait at least 2 months after travel or 2 months after symptoms started if they get sick before trying to get pregnant. The waiting period is longer for men because Zika stays in semen longer than in other body fluids. A: To prevent Zika and other diseases spread by mosquitoes, use Environmental Protection Agency EPA -registered insect repellents external icon on exposed skin.

The insect repellent should include one of the following ingredients: DEET, picaridin, IR, oil of lemon eucalyptus, para-menthane-diol, or 2-undecanone. Higher percentages of active ingredient provide longer protection. Always follow the label instructions when using insect repellent. A: When using insect repellent on your child always follow label instructions. CDC recommends that those who travel to areas with risk of Zika protect themselves from mosquito bites during travel and for 3 weeks after returning from travel.

Most children infected with Zika virus have no symptoms or have a mild illness, similar to adults with Zika virus infection. If you have symptoms of Zika fever, rash, headache, joint pain, red eyes, or muscle pain and you live in or recently traveled to an area with risk of Zika , you should see your doctor or healthcare provider and tell him or her about your symptoms and recent travel.

There is no specific medicine for Zika, but you can treat the symptoms. If you are diagnosed with Zika, protect those around you by taking steps to prevent mosquito bites and to prevent sexual transmission of Zika. Because Zika can generally be found in blood during approximately the first week of infection and can be passed to another person through mosquito bites, help prevent others from getting sick by strictly following steps to prevent mosquito bites during the first week of illness.

A: Local mosquito-borne spread of Zika has been previously reported in the continental United States. In and , no local mosquito-borne Zika virus transmission has been reported in the continental United States. A: CDC is working around the clock to respond to the Zika virus outbreak.

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